Ramon Goings, Ed.D. 2019

Lydia Donaldson Tutt-Jones Memorial Research Grant Recipient

Ramon Goings, Ed.D. is the 2019 recipient of the African American Success Foundation’s Lydia Donaldson Tutt-Jones Memorial Research Grant in support of his research titled Black Male Adult Learner Success in STEM Study. His study “..will explore how high-achieving Black male adult learners succeed in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors in college and explore any differences between the experiences of Black male adult learners at predominantly White institutions (PSIs) versus historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs)…”

Dr. Goings is an assistant professor of educational leadership at Loyola University Maryland. His research interests are centered on exploring the academic and social experiences of gifted/high-achieving Black males PK-PhD, diversifying the teacher and school leader workforce, and investigating the contributions of historically Black colleges and universities. Dr. Goings is the author of over 40 scholarly publications including serving as co-editor of the following books: Graduate Education at Historically Black Colleges and University: A Student Perspective (2016, Routledge Press), R.A.C.E Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in The Academy (2016, Information Age), and How Obama Changed the Political Landscape (Prager, 2017). Along with his scholarship Dr. Goings serves as the Editor-In-Chief of the Journal of African American Males in Education. Dr. Goings was named a 2017 Emerging Scholar by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education and received the 2016 College Board Professional Fellowship.

Prior to working in higher education, Dr. Goings was a music education and special education teacher in several urban school districts including Baltimore City Public Schools and was a foster care and youth probation counselor/advocate in New Haven, Connecticut. In 2013 he served as a fellow with the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans. He earned his Doctor of Education degree in urban educational leadership from Morgan State University, Master of Science in human services from Post University, and Bachelor of Arts in music education from Lynchburg College (now University of Lynchburg).